YES TO ALL

dislikes mangoes
recently relocated to the golden state
Questions?
Submissions?

morgan3llis:

dramaticfuckery:

The Daily Show”s Jessica Williams makes Paper's 'Beautiful People' List for 2014. Photographed by Harper Smith.

the biggest bad ass

thebrokenheartedthatstillsing:

maxkirin:

"This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety. Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length. And sometimes, when I am certain the reader is rested, I will engage him with a sentence of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of the cymbals—sounds that say listen to this, it is important.” - Gary Provost

Reading this was so satisfying woah

quiixotical:

bill:

ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOBAW


[VERY SMALL VOICE] foobaw!

quiixotical:

bill:

ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOBAW

image

[VERY SMALL VOICE] foobaw!

Necklaces by RubyRobinBoutique.

(Source: whimsy-cat)


Bus Roots is a living garden planted on the roofs of city buses (NY). It’s an effort that rose out of New York City designer Marco Antonio Castro Cosio’s graduate thesis at the NYU

Bus Roots is a living garden planted on the roofs of city buses (NY). It’s an effort that rose out of New York City designer Marco Antonio Castro Cosio’s graduate thesis at the NYU

Sunshine all the time makes a desert

Arab proverb (via maghfirat)

These simple words are so profound & thought provoking.

(via nisargam)

(Source: dounia-algeria)

where are the notes this is beautiful

the mobile version is amazing, click on it

This is amazing

(Source: killergnomes)

verylittlebird:

this is the sort of web content i am looking to see every day

highalia:

you said I was gonna be a mermaid

(Source: v-i-q-q-e-n)

(Source: distraction)

mammamoon:

so in my new apartment there’s a random hole in the wall, just big enough for a drake bell shrine

aximili:

i’ll just take a seat here

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

(Source: iraffiruse)

treedaughter:

peachypalm:

bohemianhomes:

Moon to Moon Blog: The Glass House

So amazing

Perfect

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